• This Jean Monnet Module has been made possible through Erasmus+ funding.  The project is registered on the Jean Monnet Directory with reference #: 575239-EPP-1-2016-1-AL-EPPJMO-MODULE under the project title ‘EU Democracy Promotion’.  The project is focused around two modules offered at the graduate and the undergraduate levels.  The courses are titled EU Democracy Promotion (for the undergraduate level) and EU Democracy Promotion: Theory and Practice (for the graduate level).  The courses are part of an institutional objective in helping strengthen UNYT’s focus on EU Studies.  This topic was selected for the focus of my modules due to it particle and theoretical significance.

     

    Historically, democratization was thought to be influenced primarily by domestic factors. However, with the growth of promotional aid activities by international actors such as the EU, UN and US, it has become apparent that international factors can have a positive effect in achieving successful democratic transitions. No actor has been more active in this respect than the EU itself. Yet despite this growing body of literature, democracy promotion remains an under-theorized research program. In other words, the conditions under which democracy promotion is likely to be effective, the mechanisms through which democracy promotion is likely to be more efficient, and other similar theoretical questions remain unclear. It is this theoretical gap, which this project targets in order to better understand the causal mechanisms of EU democracy promotion. From a more practical perspective it should be emphasized that, Albania itself is currently in the process of European integration. The two courses are therefore highly pertinent to current political debates and discourses within the country.

     

    Contact project leader: Dr. Eltion Meka at eltionmeka@unyt.edu.al

    • Eltion Meka (project leader) is an Assistant Professor and Chair of the Social Science Research Center at the University of New York Tirana. Eltion’s research interests focus in EU democracy promotion and the democratization of Eastern Europe. In the past two years Eltion has been awarded two Jean Monnet grants: A Jean Monnet Module in 2016 and a Jean Monnet Network in 2017. His work has been published in reputable international journals (such as the Journal of European Integration and Europe-Asia Studies).
    • Fatos Tarifa: With a PhD in Political Sociology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and a doctoral degree in Political Science from the University of Tirana, Prof. Fatos Tarifa is a renowned social scientist and a prolific author. He teaches political sociology, international relations, and geopolitics. His books include (in English): Europe Adrift on the Wine Dark Sea (2007), The Balkans: A Mission neither Accomplished nor Impossible (2002), The Quest for Legitimacy and the Withering Away of Utopia (2001), The Breakdown of State Socialism and the Emerging Post-Socialist Order (2001), The First Decade and After: Albania’s Democratic Transition and Consolidation in the Context of Southeast Europe (2000), Open-Ended History: Dangers and Dilemmas of Transition (1998. His numerous articles have been published in journals with impact factor, such as Social Forces (Oxford University Press), Policy Review (Stanford University/Hoover Institution), Mediterranean Quarterly (Duke University Press), Studies in Comparative International Development (Springer), East European Politics and Societies (Sage), Development and Change (Wiley-Blackwell), Communist and Post-Communist Studies (Elsevier) etc. Professor Tarifa is currently President of the Albanian Academy of Arts and Sciences.
    • Ilir Kalemaj, holds a PhD from Central European University, Budapest, Hungary. He is currently Coordinator of Political Science BA program, Director of MA in International Relations at University of New York Tirana and Head of Department of Social Sciences. He has published a myriad of scholarly papers in international and national peer-reviewed journals and has participated in more than 30 national and international conferences. Dr. Kalemaj is dealing now with issues about democratic consolidation, political culture and question of nationalism, as well as EU Integration processes and EU security.

  • COURSE SYLLABUS (Undergraduate Level)

     

    CURRENT DEBATES In Pol. Sci/Int. Rel.

    (EU Democracy Promotion)

     

    Course:                 Current Debates in Pol. Sci/Int. Rel.

    Credits:                 4

    Term:                    ________

    Time & Place:      ______________

    Office Hours:       ______________

    Tutor:                   Dr. Meka, Eltion.

    E-mail:                 eltionmeka@unyt.edu.al

     

    1. PURPOSE

    This course attempts bring together two current debates in political science and international relations.  The first part of the course will focus on the democratization literature. During the first seven weeks of the semester, students will be introduced to the core concepts of democracy, such as: what democracy is; the different forms of democratic institutions; comparisons of different democracies; transitions to democracy; problems of democracy; and finally, the consolidation of democracy.

    The second part of the semester will interact the democratization literature with the international democracy promotion literature.  During this period, students will be introduced to how international factors influence democratization, and attempt to answer questions such as: What are the effects of international factors on the consolidation of democracy in newly democratized states? Overall, the purpose of this course is to provide students with a deep understanding of how democratization is influenced by international factors.

     

    1. COURSE OBJECTIVES

    Upon the completion of this course, students should be able to:

    • Introduce theoretical aspect of democracy;
    • Analyze differences between democracies;
    • Introduce the theoretical aspect of international democracy promotion;
    • Analyze the effects of European integration on democracy in Eastern Europe;
    • Provide students with an adequate understanding of how international factors affect democracy.

     

    1. REQUIRED TEXTBOOKS

    The reading list (the reader) will be composed of a number of selected chapters from various textbooks.  The reader will be distributed by the professor through e-mail.

     

    Additionally, students will be required to register for two online courses offered by EdX.org.  The courses are titled Democratic to Authoritarian Rule and Human Rights and Development.  Please use the links below to register for the courses.

     

    1. COURSE REQUIREMENTS
    Hours Missed Grade
    0-3 100%
    4  95%
    5 90%
    6 85%
    7  80%
    8 70%
    9  60%
    10 50%
    11 40%
     12 30%
    13 20%
    14 10%

    Attendance & Participation:  Attendance in UNYT classes is mandatory. I will keep track of your attendance and punctuality every hour of class. Absences will not be excused, since students will be allowed to miss up to 3 hours per semester without it affecting the attendance grade (so you should save these absences for unforeseen events, like illness or family emergencies). In addition, students should refrain from arriving late without prior approval from the professor (or the hour will be counted as an absence). The grades for attendance + participation will be as follows (please note that they are for hours missed and not days):

    Exam: There will be a midterm exam, accounting for 30% of the final grade. The exam will consist of open-ended questions related to what’s been discussed in class up to that point.

     

    Research Paper:  Each student will also be required to submit an original research paper on a topic of European integration.  Original ideas are always welcomed, but must be approved by the professor.  Research paper is to consist of 10 pages of double-spaced text (12-point font).  Paper will account for 40% of the final grade.

    • Your research paper is required to be submitted through the TURNITIN You`ll be enrolled and receive automated messages that contain ID and password prior to due date.
    • Presentation: Each student will also be required to present their research paper to the class for another 20% of their final grade. Students should demonstrate the use of the two online courses offered by EdX during their presentation.

     

    1. GRADING
    Attendance and Participation 10%
    Mid-Term Exam 30%
    Research Paper 40%
    Paper Presentation 20%
    *Please note that no extra credit will be given to any student for any assignment.

     

    Criteria:  The criteria of evaluation will be based on how well the student has fulfilled the projected learning outcomes established for the course.

     

    Each aspect of your work for the course will receive a letter grade. Each grade will be converted to a numerical value, multiplied by the appropriate percentage, and added to your other grades to arrive at a final grade.

    Letter Grade Percent (%) Generally Accepted Meaning
          A 96-100 Outstanding work
          A- 90-95
          B+ 87-89 Good work, distinctly above average
          B 83-86
          B- 80-82
          C+ 77-79 Acceptable work
          C 73-76
          C- 70-72
          D+ 67-69 Work that is significantly below average
          D 63-66
          D- 60-62
          F 0-59 Work that does not meet minimum standards for passing the course

     

    1. GENERAL REQUIREMENTS

    Conduct: Students are expected to behave in class with civility and appropriate etiquette toward professors and one another. Please set your cell phones on silent before class begins and refrain from using them until class is over.

    Academic Integrity (Plagiarism): UNYT does not tolerate academic dishonesty. You have all read and signed the UNYT Student Honor Code with a detailed description of plagiarism and cheating. Those caught plagiarising (attempting to represent the work of another as their own) will fail the course. Note that plagiarism includes using phrases or sentences from a published work without putting that material in quotation marks and documenting the source.

    Email Communication: It is absolutely necessary for the professor to be able to communicate with the entire class via email. In addition to the Midterm and Final, I will periodically send the class important materials or updates. This semester, I will also be sending weekly questions on the readings. It is each student’s responsibility to ensure that the professor has an up-to-date and full functioning email address. It is also up to the student to keep an eye out for such emails and read them and any attachments fully.

    Support Services:  As a service to its students, UNYT has created a series of support centers. For support related to study skills and time management, the Academic Support Center offers students tutoring and coaching. The Writing Center gives students feedback and help with papers and other writing assignments. If you feel that you have any exceptional learning difficulties or serious problems that interfere with your studies, you can stop by the UNYT Counseling Center. For information on any of these centers, please contact Dr. Cenko.

    1. COURSE SCHEDULE
    Week Dates Topics and Readings
    PART 1: Democratization
    I March

    15

     INTRODUCTION

     

    II March

    22

     What is democracy?

    1.      Lipset, Seymour Martin. “Some social requisites of democracy: Economic development and political legitimacy.” American Political Science Review 53.01 (1959): 69-105.

    2.      Schmitter, Philippe C., and Terry Lynn Karl. “What democracy is… and is not.” Journal of Democracy 2.3 (1991): 75-88.

    III March

    29

     TRANSITIONS TO DEMOCRACY

    1.      Rustow, Dankwart A. “Transitions to democracy: Toward a dynamic model.” Comparative Politics (1970): 337-363.

    2.      Karl, Terry Lynn, and Philippe C. Schmitter. “Modes of transition in Latin America, southern and eastern Europe.” International Social Science Journal 128.2 (1991): 267-282.

    IV April

    5

    DEMOCRATIC CONSOLIDATION

    1.      Diamond, Larry Jay. “Toward democratic consolidation.” Journal of democracy 5.3 (1994): 4-17.

    2.      Schedler, Andreas. “What is democratic consolidation?.” Journal of Democracy 9.2 (1998): 91-107.

    V April

    12

    MEASURING AND STUDYING DEMOCRACY

    1.      Schedler, Andreas. “Measuring democratic consolidation.” Studies in Comparative International Development 36.1 (2001): 66-92.

    2.      Munck, Gerardo L., and Jay Verkuilen. “Conceptualizing and measuring democracy Evaluating alternative indices.” Comparative political studies 35.1 (2002): 5-34.

    VI April

    19

    Institutions of democracy

    1.      Lijphart, Arend. Patterns of democracy: Government forms and performance in thirty-six countries. Yale University Press, 2012. (Chapters 1, 2, and 3).

    VII April

    26

    MID-TERM EXAM
    PART 2: Democracy Promotion
    VIII May

    3

    STUDYING DEMOCRATIZATION THROUGH EUROPEAN INTEGRATION

    1.      Goetz, Klaus H. “European Integration and National Executives: A Cause in Search of an Effect?” West European Politics 23.4 (2000): 211-31.

    2.      Schimmelfennig, Frank, and Ulrich Sedelmeier. “Theorizing EU enlargement: research focus, hypotheses, and the state of research.” Journal of European Public Policy 9.4 (2002): 500-528.

    IX May

    10

    THE INTERNATIONAL CONTEXT OF DEMOCRATIZATION

    1.      Whitehead, Laurence. The International Dimensions of Democratization: Europe and the Americas. Oxford University Press, 2001.

    a.       Chapter 1 by Whitehead: “Three International Dimensions of Democratization”

    2.      Checkel, Jeffrey T. “International institutions and socialization in Europe: Introduction and framework.” International organization 59.04 (2005): 801-826

    X May

    17

    THE INTERNATIONAL CONTEXT OF DEMOCRATIZATION (cont.)

    1.      Levitsky, Steven, and Lucan A. Way. “Linkage versus leverage. Rethinking the international dimension of regime change.” Comparative Politics (2006): 379-400.

    2.      Pevehouse, Jon C. “Democracy from the outside-in? International organizations and democratization.” International organization 56.03 (2002): 515-549.

    XI May

    24

    EUROPEAN INTEGRATION AND DEMOCRATIZATION

    1.       Pridham, Geoffrey. Designing Democracy: EU Enlargement and Regime Change in Post-Communist Europe. Basingstoke, 2005. (Chapter 1 and 2.)

    XII May

    31

    PROBLEMS OFDEMOCRATIZATION THROUGH EUROPEAN INTEGRATION

    1.      Whitehead, Laurence. The International Dimensions of Democratization: Europe and the Americas. Oxford University Press, 2001. (Chapter 15 by Whitehead).

    2.      Grabbe, Heather.  The EU’s Transformative Power: Europeanization through Conditionality in Central and Eastern Europe. Palgrave Macmillan, 2006. (Chapters 2 and 9).

    XIII June

    7

    CASE STUDIES

    1.      Pridham, Geoffrey. “Status Quo Bias or Institutionalisation for Reversibility?: The EU’s Political Conditionality, Post-Accession Tendencies and Democratic Consolidation in Slovakia.” Europe-Asia Studies 60.3 (2008): 423-454.

    2.      Ganev, Venelin I. “Post-accession hooliganism: Democratic governance in Bulgaria and Romania after 2007.” East European Politics and Societies 27.1 (2013): 26-44.

     

    XIV June

    14

     EXPECTATIONS VS REALITIES OF INTEGRATION

    1.      Schmitter, Philippe C. “Portugal and Spain: A Fifteen-Year ‘Quasi-Experiment’ with European Integration in a Pair of ‘Most Similar Systems’.” South European Society and Politics 8.1-2 (2003): 314-22.

    2.      Meka, Eltion. “European Integration, Democratic Consolidation, and Democratic Regression in CEE: An Institutional Assessment.” Journal of European Integration 38.2 (2016): 179-194.

    XV June

    21

     RESEARCH PAPER DUE!

    RESEARCH PRESENTATIONS BY STUDENTS

     

    ==========================================================================================

     

     

    COURSE SYLLABUS (Graduate Level)

    EU Democracy Promotion: Theory and Practice

     

    School: Humanities and Social Sciences

    Course Lecturer: Dr. Eltion Meka  (email eltionmeka@unyt.edu.al)

    Level: Master

    Office hours: By arrangement.                    

    Credit: 3                                                         Effective term: Fall 2017

    Aims:

    The purpose of this course is to analyse the theoretical and empirical literature on EU democracy promotion.  As the EU has become the world’s leading promoter of democracy, we have witnessed a growing body of literature on how the EU affects democracy in its surrounding regions.  This course will provide students with the opportunity to analyse and discuss the reasons for democracy promotion, the challenges of democracy promotion, and finally, the efficacy of democracy promotion.

    The course will be divided into three parts.  First part asks the question what is democracy promotion for a deep understand of democracy promotion.  Second part looks at the more theoretical questions such as under what conditions is democracy promotion likely to be effective.  While the third and final part takes a deeper empirical look through various cases studies in order to determine the extent to which theoretical proposition on democracy promotion are supported by empirical realities.

     

    Assignments:

    Three will be one major assignment in the form of a research paper.  The paper will be submitted in three separate parts:

    • First Draft: A four-page summary of what the student is planning on writing. Accounts for 20% of the final grade. DUE on September 28th at 11:59pm.
    • Second Draft: A ten-page summary of what should be the introduction, literature review and methodology of the final paper. Accounts for 20% of the final grade. DUE on October 24th at 11:59pm.
    • Final paper: The final paper should no shorter than 20 pages in length (double spaced). Accounts for 40% of the final grade. DUE on November 3rd at 11:59pm.
    • Paper presentation: At the final week of class each student will be required to do a 15-minute presentation of the research papers. 10% of the final grade.

     

    Paper Topics:

    1. The EU has become the most active international player in democracy promotion. Analyze the ways in which the EU actively promotes democracy in regions not currently in the process of European integration such as Northern Africa, the Caucuses region and European Neighborhood.
    2. Democracy is promoted through a variety of means. Compare the varieties of democracy promotion as applied by international actors such as the EU, UN, USA and others.
    3. It has been argued that the Eastern enlargement of the EU has been the most effective case ever of democracy promotion. Analyze the mechanisms of democracy promotion through EU enlargement.
    4. Democracy promotion is thought to be an under-theorized research program. Analyze the ways in which democracy promotion is under-theorized and the limitations of the research program.
    5. The argument that EU membership contributes to the consolidation of democracy first emerged with the Southern enlargement of the 1980s in which Greece, Spain and Portugal joined the EU. How did the EU contribute to the consolidation of democracy in Southern Europe and what were the lessons for Eastern Europe?
    6. How does European integration effect party systems and political competition in candidate states?
    7. The EU promotes different aspects of democracy such as civil society, anti-corruption measures, local governance, etc. Pick any one of these democratic issues and examine how the EU promotes their development.

     

    **Note that each topic presented above should be accompanied by case studies.

     

    Required Textbooks and Articles:

    See class schedule.

     

    Additionally, students will be required to register for an online course offered by EdX.org.  The course is titled The EU and Human Rights.  Please use the links below to register for the courses.

     

    Course Requirements

    Hours Missed Grade
    0-3 100%
    4  95%
    5 90%
    6 85%
    7  80%
    8 70%
    9  60%
    10 50%
    11 40%
     12 30%
    13 20%
    14 10%

    Attendance & Punctuality:  Attendance in UNYT classes is mandatory. I will keep track of your attendance and punctuality every hour of class. Absences will not be excused, since students will be allowed to miss up to 3 hours per semester without it affecting the attendance grade (so you should save these absences for unforeseen events, like illness or family emergencies). In addition, students should refrain from arriving late without prior approval from the professor (or the hour will be counted as an absence). The grades for attendance will be as follows (please note that they are for hours missed and not days).

     

    Assessment Criteria

    Attendance and Participation 10%
    First Draft 20%
    Second Draft 20%
    Final Paper 40%
    Paper Presentation 10%
    *Please note that no extra credit will be given.

     

    Academic Dishonesty:  UNYT does not tolerate academic dishonesty. You have all read and signed the UNYT Student Honor Code with a detailed description of plagiarism and cheating. Those caught plagiarising (attempting to represent the work of another as their own) will fail the course. Note that plagiarism includes using phrases or sentences from a published work without putting that material in quotation marks and documenting the source.

     

    General Information

    Student Conduct:  Students are expected to behave with appropriate etiquette in the classroom. Please set your cell phones on silent before class begins and refrain from using them until class is over.

    Office Hours:  For Master’s students, these should be arranged independently (although there are office hours posted on my office door).

    Outside Support:  As a service to its students UNYT has created a series of support centers. While these services are primarily designed for undergraduate students, they are also available for M.A. students. For support related to study skills and time management, the Academic Support Center offers students tutoring and coaching. The Writing Center gives students feedback and help with papers and other writing assignments. If you feel that you have any exceptional learning difficulties or serious problems that interfere with your studies, you can stop by the UNYT Counseling Center. For information on any of these centers, please contact Dr. Cenko or me.

    Letter Grade Percent (%) Generally Accepted Meaning
          A 96-100 Outstanding work
          A- 90-95
          B+ 87-89 Good work, distinctly above average
          B 83-86
          B- 80-82
          C+ 77-79 Acceptable work
          C 73-76
          C- 70-72
          D+ 67-69 Work that is significantly below average
          D 63-66
          D- 60-62
          F 0-59 Work that does not meet minimum standards for passing the course

     

     

    COURSE SCHEDULE

    Week Dates Topics and Readings
    PART 1: Democratization
    I  

     

     INTRODUCTION: WHAT IS DEMOCRACY PROMOTION?

    Required readings

    ·         Whitehead, Laurence. The International Dimensions of Democratization: Europe and the Americas. Oxford University Press, 2001.

    o   Chapter 1 by Whitehead: “Three International Dimensions of Democratization”

    o   Chapter 2 by Schmitter: “The Influence of the International Context upon the Choices of National Institutions and Policies in Neo-Democracies”

    Suggested readings

    ·         Pridham, Geoffrey, Eric Herring, and George Sanford, eds. Building democracy. A&C Black, 1997.

    o   Chapter 1 by Pridham: “The international dimension of democratisation: theory, practice and inter-regional comparisons”.

    II   THEORIZING DEMOCRACY PROMTION

    Required readings

    ·         Schimmelfennig, Frank, and Ulrich Sedelmeier. “Theorizing EU enlargement: research focus, hypotheses, and the state of research.” Journal of European Public Policy 9.4 (2002): 500-528.

    ·         Pridham, G. 2005. Designing democracy. New York, NY: Basingstoke.

    -Chapter 1: “Theoretical Perspectives on European Enlargement and Democratisation”

    Suggested readings

    ·         Wolff, Jonas, and Iris Wurm. “Towards a theory of external democracy promotion. A proposal for theoretical classification.” Security Dialogue 42.1 (2011): 77-96.

    III   METHODOLOGICAL ISSUES

    Required readings

    ·         Goetz, Klaus H. “European integration and national executives: a cause in search of an effect?.” West European Politics 23.4 (2000): 211-231.

    ·         Haverland, Markus. “Does the EU cause domestic developments? The problem of case selection in Europeanization research.” European Integration online Papers (EIoP) 9.2 (2005).

    Suggested readings

    ·         Exadaktylos, Theofanis, and Claudio M. Radaelli. “Research design in European studies: the case of Europeanization.” JCMS: Journal of Common Market Studies 47.3 (2009): 507-530.

    IV   THEORETICAL APPROACHES TO DEMOCRACY PROMOTION

    Required readings

    3.      Levitsky, Steven, and Lucan A. Way. “Linkage versus leverage. Rethinking the international dimension of regime change.” Comparative Politics (2006): 379-400.

    4.      Pevehouse, Jon C. “Democracy from the outside-in? International organizations and democratization.” International organization 56.03 (2002): 515-549.

    Suggested readings

    5.      Poast, Paul, and Johannes Urpelainen. “How International Organizations Support Democratization: Preventing Authoritarian Reversals or Promoting Consolidation?.” World Politics 67.01 (2015): 72-113.

    6.      Way, Lucan A., and Steven Levitsky. “Linkage, leverage, and the post-communist divide.” East European Politics & Societies 21.1 (2007): 48-66.

    V   SOUTHERN ENLARGEMENT AND DEMOCRACY PROMOTION

    Required readings:

    ·         Royo, Sebastián, and Paul Christopher Manuel. “Some lessons from the fifteenth anniversary of the accession of Portugal and Spain to the European Union.” South European Society and Politics 8.1-2 (2003): 1-30.

    ·         Schmitter, Philippe C. “Portugal and Spain: A Fifteen-Year ‘Quasi-Experiment’ with European Integration in a Pair of ‘Most Similar Systems’.” South European Society and Politics 8.1-2 (2003): 314-322

    Suggested readings:

    ·         Fishman, Robert M. “Shaping, not making, democracy: The European Union and the post-authoritarian political transformations of Spain and Portugal.” South European Society and Politics 8.1-2 (2003): 31-46.

    ·         Royo, Sebastián. “The 2004 enlargement: Iberian lessons for post-communist Europe.” South European Society and Politics 8.1-2 (2003): 287-313.

    VI   EASTERN ENLARGEMENT AND DEMOCRACY PROMOTION

    Required readings:

    ·         Whitehead, Laurence. The International Dimensions of Democratization: Europe and the Americas. Oxford University Press, 2001.

    a.       Chapter 15 by Whitehead: “The enlargement of the European Union: a ‘risky’ form of democracy promotion”.

    ·         Grabbe, Heather. “European Union conditionality and the acquis communautaire.” International political science review 23.3 (2002): 249-268.

    Suggested readings:

    ·         Featherstone, Kevin, and Claudio M. Radaelli, eds. The politics of Europeanization. Oxford University Press, 2003.

    a.       Chapter 13 by Grabbe: “Europeanization Goes East: Power and Uncertainty in the EU Accession Process”.

    ·         Rupnik, Jacques, and Jan Zielonka. “Introduction: The State of Democracy 20 Years on Domestic and External Factors.” East European Politics & Societies 27.1 (2013): 3-25.

    VII   DEMOCRACY PROMOTION AND PARTY SYSTEMS

    Required readings:

    ·         Lewis, Paul G., and Zdenka Mansfeldová, eds. The European Union and Party Politics in Central and Eastern Europe. Palgrave Macmillan, 2007.

    ·         Chapter 1 by Lewis: “The EU and Party Politics and Central and Eastern Europe: Questions and Issues”.

    ·         Chapter 9 by Ladrech: “(Shallow) Europeanisation and party system instability in post communist states: how changing constraints undermine the development of stable partisan linkages.”

    Suggested readings:

    ·         Lewis, Paul G., and Zdenka Mansfeldová, eds. The European Union and Party Politics in Central and Eastern Europe. Palgrave Macmillan, 2007.

    ·         Chapter 12 by Enyedi and Lewis: “The Impact of the European Union on Party Politics in Central and Eastern Europe.”

    ·         Mair, Peter. “Political Opposition and the European Union.” Government and Opposition 42.1 (2007): 1-17.

    VIII   DEMOCRACY PROMOTION AND POLITICAL COMPETITION

    Required readings:

    3.      Vachudova, Milada A. “Tempered by the EU? Political parties and party systems before and after accession.” Journal of European Public Policy 15.6 (2008): 861-879.

    4.      Grzymala-Busse, Anna, and Abby Innes. “Great expectations: The EU and domestic political competition in East Central Europe.” East European Politics and Societies 17.1 (2003): 64-73.

    Suggested readings:

    5.      de Wilde, Pieter, and Hans-Jörg Trenz. “Denouncing European integration: Euroscepticism as polity contestation.” European Journal of Social Theory (2012), March 14: 1368431011432968.

    6.      Meka, Eltion. “EU Integration under Highly Fractionalised Party Systems: The Cases of Poland and the Czech Republic.” Europe-Asia Studies 68.9 (2016): 1467-1485.

    IX   SOME UNANSWERED QUESTIONS + PAPER PRESENTATIONS

    Required readings

    ·         Carothers, Thomas. “The end of the transition paradigm.” Journal of democracy 13.1 (2002): 5-21.

    ·         Schmitter, Philippe C., and Javier Santiso. “Three temporal dimensions to the consolidation of democracy.” International Political Science Review 19.1 (1998): 69-92.

    X   PAPER PRESENTATIONS (cont.)

    Reading material will be provided by the professor through email.

  • Fall 2016–Student Papers

    Fall 2017–Student Papers