E-mail:                       ermalhasimja@unyt.edu.al

Office Hours:            Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays 10.00-12.00.

 

Course Description: This course offers an introduction to the mass communication theories, tools, characteristics and trends in our days. The course is based on a two-fold basis: one theoretical and the other practical or analytical. Students are required to participate in group and individual analysis of mass media messages in order to understand its concrete functioning.

Course Goals:

  1. Improve students’ understanding of the mass media theories.
  2. Improve students’ media literacy.

Prerequisites: No prerequisite. Reasonable competence in written communication is necessary.

 

Readings Required: Baran, Stanley (2006). Introduction to Mass Communication. McGraw-Hill International Edition.

 

Grading and Assessment:

The students will undergo a midterm and a final exam; both written. They will also be required to prepare and present before the class a research essay. Its topic will be proposed by the student, but will need to have the instructor’s approval.

 

In-class presentations:

Students are recommended to deliver a PowerPoint presentation.

 

Plagiarism is prohibited. Always cite your sources. If you have questions about this, ask me in class, or during office hours, before you hand in your assignment.

 

Grade Weights are as follows:

 

Assignment Weight
Research Paper 20
Midterm Exam 30
Final Exam 40
In-class participation 10
TOTAL 100

           

 

 

Grade Breakdowns are as follows:

 

A 96-100% C 73-76%
 A- 90-95%  C- 70-72%
  B+ 87-89%   D+ 67-69%
B 83-86% D 63-66%
 B- 80-82%   D- 60-62%
  C+ 77-79% F 0-59%

 

 

 

 

Wittgenstein, Ludwig (2009). Philosophical Investigations. Wiley-Blackwell; 4 edition.

Bourdieu, Pierre (2009), Language and Symbolic Power, Harvard University Press.

Foucault, Michel (1998), The will to knowledge. Penguin Books.

 

The Course Schedule

 

Date Topic Reading
Session 1

 

Introduction to the course: Communication, Language and technology.
  • Wittgenstein, Ludwig (2009). Philosophical Investigations. Wiley-Blackwell.
  • Bourdieu, Pierre (2009), Language and Symbolic Power, Harvard University Press.
  • Foucault, Michel (1998), The will to knowledge. Penguin Books.
Session 2

 

Mass Communication and Culture 1 Stanley 2006, Part One
Session 3

 

Audiences, Markets and Technology. Stanley 2006, Part One
Session 4

 

Mass Communication and Media Channels: Print, Radio, Television. Stanley 2006, Part Two
Session 5

 

Theories of Mass Communication 1 Stanley 2006, Part Four
Session 6

 

Theories of Mass Communication 2 Stanley 2006, Part Four
Session 7

 

Mass Communication in the Age of Internet. Social Networks and Political Mass Communication. Stanley 2006, Part Two.
Session 8

 

Midterm Exam + In-class Presentations
Session 9

 

Advertising Stanley 2006, Part Three.
Session 10

 

Public Relations Stanley 2006, Part Three.
Session 11

 

Media and Democracy.
  • Bourdieu, Pierre (2009), Language and Symbolic Power, Harvard University Press.
  • Foucault, Michel (1998), The will to knowledge. Penguin Books.
Session 12

 

Americanization of Political Mass Communication.
  • Blumler, Jay G. and Gurevitch, Michael. 2001. “Americanization Reconsidered: UK-US Campaign Comparisons Across Time” from Bennett, L. and Entman, R. Mediated Politics, pp.380-407. Cambridge University Press
  • Shea, Daniel M. & Burton, Michael John. 2001. Campaign Craft. Praeger, London.
  • Farrell, David and R. Schmitt-Beck.  2002. “Studying political campaigns and their effects”from Farrell, David and R. Schmitt-Beck (eds), Do Political campaigns matter? London: Routledge, pp.1-21 (Chapter 1).
  • Blumler, Jay G. and Gurevitch, Michael. 2001. “Americanization Reconsidered: UK-US Campaign Comparisons Across Time” from Bennett, L. and Entman, R. Mediated Politics, Cambridge University Press, pp.380-407.
Session 13

 

Journalism and democratic mythology: objectivity, independence and impartiality.
  • Barnett, Steven and Gaber, Ivor. 2001. “The crisis in political journalism: an outline of the argument” from Barnett, Steven and Gaber, Ivor., The Westminster tales: the changing relationship between politicians and the media, Continuum International, pp.1-11.
  • Herman, Edward S and Chomksy, Noam. 1994. “A Propaganda Model” from Herman, Edward S and Chomksy, Noam, Manufacturing consent : the political economy of the mass media pp.1-35, London: Vintage
  • Blumler, Jay G. and Gurevitch, Michael. 1996.  “Rethinking the Study of Political Communications” from Curran, James and Gurevitch, Michael, Eds. Mass Media & Society pp.155-175, Arnold Publishers
  • Matos, Carolina. 2008.  “Partisanship versus professionalism: the role of the journalist in the democratization process” from Matos, Carolina, Journalism and Political Democracy in Brazil pp.197-231, Lexington Books
Session 14

 

Analysis of concrete case studies from today journalism. Media texts to be used, especially from newspapers and Internet news sources.
Session 15

 

Final Exam + In-Class Presentations.

 

 

General Policies:

  • Lecture attendance is mandatory. If a student is absent for more than 20% of the course (i.e. 9 hours), then ‘F’ will be the grade awarded for the course.
  • The workload assumes that students are spending two hours studying for every one hour in class. For this session that means that you should expect to study for about 6 hours a week outside of the class time.
  • Students who are disruptive in class will be asked to leave. Disruption includes anything that negatively interrupts the flow of lecture or discussion. If you need to sleep, please do so outside of class. Cellular phones should be off during class. On no account should students answer their cell phones during class, or leave the room to do so unless you clear it with the professor before class starts.
  • I encourage students to work together and help each other out as much as possible in terms of discussing and reviewing the material. However, each student must turn in or complete in class work they have completed originally for this class. Plagiarism involves passing of the work of others as your own or any other form of academic dishonesty such as copying from another student in class or submitting the same paper to two different classes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Faculty: Arts & Sciences.

Department: Humanities & S.Sc.

Grade: Undergraduate.

Majors: Humanities and Social Studies.

Study Fileds: Communication and Journalism and Political Sciences International Relations.

Course Year: 2.

Course Program: UNYT.

Scheduele: THU 09-12:00

Instructor: Dr. Ermal Hasimja

Credits:

Prerequisite: Composition I