Lecturer: Elona Gjebrea, Ph.D. Office:4th floor at the main building

of UNYT Phone:4223056/7/8

E-Mail: egjebrea@unyt.edu.al

Office Hours: TWF 13.30-15:30, or by appointment UNYT webpage : http://www.unyt.edu.al Lecture hours: Mon and Wed, 16.00-1900 at 2A Friday 9.00-12.00 at 2A

Lecture Textbook: Biology, Raven and Johnson, ISBN 0-07-243731-6 Human Biology, Mike Boyle, Kathryn Senior, ISBN 0-007135998

Additional reference books will be given during the class hours.

Description: This course is a basic study of the structure and functioning of the human body. Emphasis will be placed on the interrelationships among the systems.
It is designed to acquaint students with the fundamental terms, concepts, and principles of human biology as they relate to the individual, society, and the environment. Though taking this course will not qualify you as “experts” in the field, it will give you a greater understanding, appreciation and, in some areas, working knowledge of the biology of humans.

Course Objectives:

After this course you will be expected to be able to:
1. state major biological principles of the human body.
2. describe the major physiological and anatomical characteristics of the human body.
3. explain how body organ systems function as a unit.
4. describe the interconnectedness of the human body’s organ systems and how pathologies

and/or abnormalities affect a person’s well being. 5. explain science’s effects on humanity.

Testing: One field trip will be equal with 20%, mid term 35% and final exam 40%. Class participation and home works will be equal with 15%. The outline and instructions for the field trip will be given in the class.

Make-up Policy: There will be no exam make ups! A missed exam = a grade of 0.
Attendance: You are expected to attend all lectures and arrive on time. If you arrive late be

polite as you enter and do not disrupt others; in such case extra time for exams, etc. will NOT be provided. An excessive amount of absences (as deemed by the instructor) may result in a grade of F or your withdrawal from the course, at the instructor’s option. Frequently in lecture, I inform students of important concepts that they need to know for an upcoming exam so it will be worth your while to attend all classes.

Plagiarism & Cheating: Students must submit their own work on all assignments, quizzes & exams. Plagiarism can be defined as using another’s thoughts or words, claimed as one’s own. In specific circumstances it is acceptable to use another’s ideas, but the source must be cited in a clear and accepted manner. These ideas must not be the main body of the work in which it is cited by the student, but rather must be incorporated into the work in some new manner. Indications of cheating during an examination include talking with other students,

using non-approved notes, shuffling through notebooks, looking at other’s exam
papers, excessive coughing, etc. Known cheaters will receive a failing grade and be
reported to their academic dean for further discipline.
Teaching Procedures: These will include (but not be limited to) lecture (mostly), group discussion, in-class activities and demonstration.

Miscellaneous:

Students are responsible to keep all their graded work in a notebook or folder until a final grade has been given. This is your only proof of the grade you have earned on specific assignments, exams, etc.
Pagers and cell phones must be turned off or be put in silent mode before class, unless you have my prior permission. Students may use tape recorders and portable computers in class, unless they become a distraction; arrive and set-up these devices early.

Criteria for Determination of Grade, including Evaluation Methods

Participation and home work

15%

Quiz 1st/ Field trip presentation

20%

Midterm

35%

Final

40%

Letter Grade

Percent (%)

Generally Accepted Meaning

A

96-100

Outstanding work

A-

90-95

B+

87-89

Good work, distinctly above average

B

83-86

B-

80-82

C+

77-79

Acceptable work

C

73-76

C-

70-72

D+

67-69

Work that is significantly below average

D

63-66

D-

60-62

F

0-59

Work that does not meet minimum standards for passing the course

Technology Expectations: Power-point, excel, lecture outlines etc. will be used during the lectures hours.

LECTURE SCHEDULE (Summer 2010)

DATE

28 and 30 June

9 July

TOPIC Reading

Introduction: How we work, Human perspective and How science works

The Chemicals of life

Cells, Tissues and organelles

FIELD TRIP

Movement in and out of cells. Enzymes and metabolism
Nerves and impulses. The nervous system The nervous system

MID TERM EXAM

Endocrine system. Hormones
Senses and Behavior
Circulatory system and Immune system

Human reproduction, infectious diseases Temperature regulation. Excretion and water balance Nutrition and digestion. The digestive human system

Genetics, disease and future

Lifestyle diseases. Cancer

FINAL EXAM

Chapter 1 Chapter 3 Chapter 2 Chapter 4,5

Chapter 15 Chapter 16

Chapter 18,19

Chapter 10, 30

Chapter 20,29 Chapter 12,13 Chapter 7.8

Chapter 32 Chapter 31

23 July

DATE TOPIC Reading

Note: Students: If you feel that you have special learning difficulties, please, make an appointment with Ms. Anxhela Gramo. Ms.Gramo is trained to help students with learning difficulties. She has offered to provide this service to our students, just as it is offered in all American universities