Office Hours:       By appointment or from 11:00 – 13:00 on Mondays.      

 

PURPOSE

European integration has become an important research program in Political Science/International Relations for a variety of reasons, starting with the most basic of questions: Why do States seek to integrate into closer ties with one another?  The answer to this question (and related questions) are often answered from a variety of theoretical view points.  The purpose of this course would be to analyze those particular theoretical approaches to European integration in order to better understand not only the progression of European integration over time, but at the same time, to better analyze the future paths of integration.

The course will be divided into three separate by equally related parts.  The first part will focus on the various theoretical approaches to European integration.  The second part will take a closer look at the inner workings to the European Union (EU) and its impact on the domestic context.  Lastly, the third part will focus on the important Enlargement policy of the EU.

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES

Upon the completion of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Understand and distinguish the various theoretical approaches to European Integration.
  2. Understand policy-making in the EU and the impact this has on integration.
  3. Gain a better understanding of EU enlargement: Its theoretical propositions and empirical realities.
  4. Be able to express the following course objectives in a thought-out research paper.

 

REQUIRED TEXTBOOKS

The reading list (the reader) will be composed of a number of selected chapters from various textbooks.  The reader will be distributed by the professor through e-mail (no purchase of reading materials is required).

The various selected chapters will be pulled out of the following books:

Wiener, Antje, and Thomas Diez. European Integration Theory (Second Edition). Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009.

Featherstone, Kevin, and Claudio M. Radaelli, eds. The Politics of Europeanization. Oxford University Press, 2003.

Schimmelfennig, Frank, and Ulrich Sedelmeier, eds. The Politics of European Union Enlargement: Theoretical Approaches. Routledge, 2005.

 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

Hours Missed Grade
0-3 100%
4  95%
5 90%
6 85%
7  80%
8 70%
9  60%
10 50%
11 40%
 12 30%
13 20%
14 10%

Attendance & Punctuality:  Attendance in UNYT classes is mandatory. I will keep track of your attendance and punctuality every hour of class. Absences will not be excused, since students will be allowed to miss up to 3 hours per semester without it affecting the attendance grade (so you should save these absences for unforeseen events, like illness or family emergencies). In addition, students should refrain from arriving late without prior approval from the professor (or the hour will be counted as an absence). The grades for attendance will be as follows (please note that they are for hours missed and not days):

Exams: There will be two in-class exams during the semester.  The first will be the midterm exam, accounting for 25% of the final grade; and the second will be the final exam, accounting for another 25% of the final grade.  The two exams will consists of open-ended questions related to what’s been discussed in class up to that point.  In other words, the midterm will consist of questions related to weeks 1 though 7 of the course; while the final exam will be cumulative and consists of all 15 weeks.

 

Research Paper:  Each student will also be required to submit an original research paper on a topic of European integration.  Original ideas are always welcomed, but most be approved by the professor.  Research paper is to consist of 7-10 pages of double-spaced text (12 point font).  Paper will account for 30% of the final grade.

  • Your research paper is required to be submitted through the TURNITIN You`ll be enrolled and receive automated messages that contain ID and password prior to due date.
  • Presentation: Each student will also be required to present their research paper to the class for another 10% of their final grade.

 

  1. GRADING
Attendance and Participation 10%
Mid-Term Exam 25%
Final Exam 25%
Research Paper 30%
Paper Presentation 10%
*Please note that no extra credit will be given to any student for any assignment.

 

Criteria:  The criteria of evaluation will be based on how well the student has fulfilled the projected learning outcomes established for the course.

Each aspect of your work for the course will receive a letter grade. Each grade will be converted to a numerical value, multiplied by the appropriate percentage, and added to your other grades to arrive at a final grade.

Letter Grade Percent (%) Generally Accepted Meaning
      A 96-100 Outstanding work
      A- 90-95
      B+ 87-89 Good work, distinctly above average
      B 83-86
      B- 80-82
      C+ 77-79 Acceptable work
      C 73-76
      C- 70-72
      D+ 67-69 Work that is significantly below average
      D 63-66
      D- 60-62
      F 0-59 Work that does not meet minimum standards for passing the course

 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS

Conduct: Students are expected to behave in class with civility and appropriate etiquette toward professors and one another. Please set your cell phones on silent before class begins and refrain from using them until class is over.

Academic Integrity (Plagiarism): UNYT does not tolerate academic dishonesty. You have all read and signed the UNYT Student Honor Code with a detailed description of plagiarism and cheating. Those caught plagiarising (attempting to represent the work of another as their own) will fail the course. Note that plagiarism includes using phrases or sentences from a published work without putting that material in quotation marks and documenting the source.

Email Communication: It is absolutely necessary for the professor to be able to communicate with the entire class via email. In addition to the Midterm and Final, I will periodically send the class important materials or updates. This semester, I will also be sending weekly questions on the readings. It is each student’s responsibility to ensure that the professor has an up-to-date and full functioning email address. It is also up to the student to keep an eye out for such emails and read them and any attachments fully.

Support Services:  As a service to its students, UNYT has created a series of support centers. For support related to study skills and time management, the Academic Support Center offers students tutoring and coaching. The Writing Center gives students feedback and help with papers and other writing assignments. If you feel that you have any exceptional learning difficulties or serious problems that interfere with your studies, you can stop by the UNYT Counseling Center. For information on any of these centers, please contact Dr. Cenko, Dr. Canollari, your academic advisor or me.

COURSE SCHEDULE

Week Dates Topics and Readings
PART 1: THEORY
I October

12

 INTRODUCTION
II October

23

 CLASS RESCHADULED FOR OCT. 23 FROM 1:30PM-4:30PM

INTEGRATION THEORY AND EUROPEANIZATION

Readings: Wiener & Diez: Chapter 1; Featherstone & Radaelli: Chapter 1.

III October

26

 FEDERALISM & Neofunctionalism

Readings: Wiener & Diez: Chapters 2&3.

IV November

2

Liberal Intergovernmentalism & New institutionalism

Readings:  Wiener & Diez: Chapters 4&7.

V November

9

CASE STUDIES: FRANCE and GERMANY

Readings:  Kassim, et. al.: Chapters 2&3.

VI November

16

CASE STUDIES: SPAIN and PORTUGAL

Readings:  Kassim, et. al.: Chapters 5&6.

VII November

 23

MID-TERM EXAM
VIII November

30

 No class (holiday)
PART 2: THE EU AND PUBLIC POLICY
IX December

7

EUROPEANIZATION AND PUBLIC POLICY

Readings:  Featherstone & Radaelli: Chapter 2.

X December

14

 GOVERNANCE APPROACHES

Readings:  Wiener & Diez: Chapter 5.

XI December

21

 Policy networks

Readings:  Wiener & Diez: Chapter 6.

PART 3: ENLARGEMENT
XII January

11

 THEORIZING EU ENLARGEMENT

Readings:  Schimmelfennig & Sedelmeier: Chapter 1.

(Presentations)

XIII January

18

 the demand-side of enlargement

Readings:  Schimmelfennig & Sedelmeier: Chapter 3.

(Presentations)

XIV January

25

 The supply-side of enlargement

Readings:  Schimmelfennig & Sedelmeier: Chapter 7&9.

(Presentations)

XV February

1

 THE EASTERN ENLARGEMENT

Readings:  Featherstone & Radaelli: Chapter 13.

(Final Exam Review)

XVI February  8 RESEARCH PAPER DUE RIGHT BEFORE CLASS (either by email or in paper)

Final Exam

 

 

 

 

 

Faculty: Arts & Sciences.

Department: Humanities & S.Sc.

Grade: Undergraduate.

Majors: Humanities and Social Studies.

Study Fileds: Political Sciences International Relations.

Course Year: 3.

Course Program: ESC.

Scheduele: MON 13:00-16:00

Instructor: Kalemaj Ilir

Credits: 4

Prerequisite: uropean Union: Structures and Institutions